Prehistoric Pottery from Northwest China

, University Study Gallery, Harvard Art Museums
  • Storage Jar with Painted Bichrome Decor and Burnished Surface

  • Bird-shaped jar

    Bird-shaped jar

    Compressed, wide-bodied jar with open mouth, bulbous, off-center neck, flattened shoulders, sides tapering inward to a small, flat base, two strap lug handles embellished with crimped appliques, and a small triangular tab below the shoulder, opposite the mouth and neck; buff earthenware lightly burnished and decorated with geometric designs painted in black and burgundy slips before firing; decoration on the shoulders includes four round cartouches of small checkerboard patterns. Majiayao culture, Machang type. From the upper Yellow River valley region; Gansu, Qinghai, or Ningxia province. This type of jar is said to resemble a squat waterfowl, with the jar’s neck, lug handles, and tab representing a bird’s head, wings, and tail, respectively.

  • Bottle

    Bottle

    Small ovoid vessel with everted lip, cylindrical neck, sloping shoulders, lower body tapering inward to a small flat base, and two loop handles just below shoulders; buff earthenware lightly burnished and decorated with abstract designs painted in black slip before firing; painted designs on body, neck, and rim include eye-like dotted roundels surrounded by curvilinear triangles swirling and horizontal lines encircling the neck and lower body. and crossed lines encircling the vessel, each surrounded by curvilinear triangles, arcs, and lines. Majiayao culture, Majiayao type. From the upper Yellow River valley region; Gansu, Qinghai, or Ningxia province.

  • Spouted jug with anthropomorphic top

    Spouted jug with anthropomorphic top

    Pouring vessel with angular neck, ovoid body, strap handle attached from rim to shoulder, tubular spout, and opening in the form of a laughing human face; buff earthenware. Qijia culture. From the upper Yellow River valley region; Gansu, Qinghai, or Shaanxi province or Inner Mongolia.

  • Covered Jar

    Covered Jar

    Covered globular jar with two S-form strap handles, the cover with finial in the form of a cylinder and disk; Buff with applique handles. Qijia culture. From the upper Yellow River valley region; Gansu, Qinghai, or Shaanxi province or Inner Mongolia.

  • Jar cord marked decor

    Jar cord marked decor

    Jar with flared mouth, sloped shoulders, sides tapering inward to a flat base, and strap handles; red earthenware with applique handles and cord-impressed decoration. Qijia culture. From the upper Yellow River valley region; Gansu, Qinghai, or Shaanxi province or Inner Mongolia.

  • Large, Ovoid Jar with Cylindrical Neck, Flaring Lip, Two Loop Handles, and Geometric Decoration of So-called

    Large, Ovoid Jar with Cylindrical Neck, Flaring Lip, Two Loop Handles, and Geometric Decoration of So-called "Yoke" or "Ram's Horn" Pattern

  • Wide-mouthed jar

    Wide-mouthed jar

    Compressed ovoid vessel with everted rim, sloping shoulders, lower body tapering inward to a flat base, and two loop handles angled downward, positioned bilaterally at the midsection; buff earthenware lightly burnished and decorated with abstract designs painted in dark brown slip before firing; painted designs on upper half of body and rim include cruciform motifs within medallions surrounded by curvilinear triangles, arcs, and lines. Decoration reminiscent of painted pottery from Shilingxia.

  • Miniature Jar with anthropomorphic cover Miniature Jar with anthropomorphic cover

    Miniature Jar with anthropomorphic cover Miniature Jar with anthropomorphic cover

    Miniature covered jar with globular body and two loop handles, the lid with tall finial in the form of a stylized human head; buff earthenware with applique elements. Probably Qijia culture. From the upper Yellow River valley region; Gansu, Qinghai, or Shaanxi province or Inner Mongolia.

  • Wide-mouthed jar with pictorial decoration

    Wide-mouthed jar with pictorial decoration

    Compressed ovoid vessel with flat, everted rim, sloping shoulders, lower half tapering inward to a flat base, and two loop handles positioned bilaterally at the midsection; buff earthenware lightly burnished and decorated with pictorial designs painted in dark black slip on the upper half and rim before firing; painted designs include zoomorphic frog- or turtle-like creatures with human heads on one side and wavy lines reminiscent of flowing water on the other. Majiayao culture, Majiayao type. From the upper Yellow River valley region; Gansu, Qinghai, or Ningxia province.

  • Wide-mouthed jar with two strap handles

    Wide-mouthed jar with two strap handles

    Small globular jar with flared mouth, long neck, wide body, lower portion tapering inward to a small, flat base, and with two strap handles attached from rim to shoulders; buff earthenware with geometric decoration painted in black slip on the rim, neck, body, and handles; small fragments of turquoise inlaid into dots of black adhesive around the neck and at the ends of the handles. Siba culture. From the upper Yellow River valley region, probably Gansu province.

  • Double-handled jar

    Double-handled jar

    Wide-mouthed jar with ovoid body, straight neck, crimped “pie-crust” rim, and two strap handles attached from rim to shoulders; reddish buff earthenware with dark fire markings and with cord-impressed decoration. Xindian culture. From the upper Yellow River valley region; Gansu, Qinghai, or Ningxia province.

  • Basin

    Basin

    Circular basin with everted rim, rounded sides, lower body tapering inward to a flat base, and two crenellated handles positioned bilaterally on the exterior at the juncture where the lower body begins to taper; buff earthenware lightly burnished and decorated with geometric designs painted in dark brown slip before firing; painted designs include dots surrounded by concentric rings and sweeping arcs, bound by undulating parallel lines (on the interior), encircled dots separated by patterns of oblique triangles arranged in symmetrical clusters (on the rim), and two dots surrounded by concentric rings on the exterior walls. Majiayao culture, Majiayao type. From the upper Yellow River valley region; Gansu, Qinghai, or Ningxia province.

  • Small, Compressed Globular Vessel with Lightly Flaring Spout, Strap Handle, and Animal-Head Decor

    Small, Compressed Globular Vessel with Lightly Flaring Spout, Strap Handle, and Animal-Head Decor

  • Amphora with Flaring Mouth and Two Lug Handles and with Cord-Marked Decor

    Amphora with Flaring Mouth and Two Lug Handles and with Cord-Marked Decor

  • Small jar with handle

    Small jar with handle

    Small jar with bulbous body, lower portion tapering inward to a small, flat base, and with single strap handle; light gray earthenware with applique handle and applique and impressed decoration forming vertical ribs on the body. Majiayao culture, Banshan type. From the upper Yellow River valley region; southern Ningxia province.

  • Small spouted jar with handle

    Small spouted jar with handle

    Small jar with short, tubular spout, rounded shoulders, sides tapering inward to a small, flat base, and with small strap handle; light gray earthenware with applique handle and applique and impressed decoration forming diagonal lines on the shoulders and horizontal lines on the lower body. Majiayao culture, Banshan type. From the upper Yellow River valley region; southern Ningxia province.

  • Wide mouthed jar

    Wide mouthed jar

    Compressed ovoid, bowl-like vessel with wide mouth, everted rim, and lower body curving inward to a flat base; red earthenware textured below the rim with incised parallel horizontal lines encircling the body, created by incising the clay surface with a pointed implement before firing; remains of earth from burial on exterior and interior. Early Yangshao culture, Banpo type. From the middle Yellow River valley region, Shaanxi province.

  • Rounded bowl

    Rounded bowl

    Shallow hemispherical bowl with rounded sides curving inward to a slightly flattened convex base; red earthenware lightly burnished on interior and exterior; decorated on the exterior around the lip with a wide band painted in brown slip before firing; some whitish encrustations from burial. Early Yangshao culture, Banpo type. From the middle Yellow River valley region, Shaanxi province.

  • Zoomorphic figurine

    Zoomorphic figurine

    Hollow sculpture in the form of a four-legged animal with a pointed muzzle and a bird-like tail; buff earthenware with traces of pigment. Qijia culture. From the upper Yellow River valley region; Gansu, Qinghai, or Shaanxi province or Inner Mongolia. Hollow sculpture in the form of a four-legged animal with a pointed muzzle and a bird-like tail; buff earthenware with traces of pigment. Qijia culture. From the upper Yellow River valley region; Gansu, Qinghai, or Shaanxi province or Inner Mongolia.

  • Basin with anthropomorphic handle

    Basin with anthropomorphic handle

    Bowl-shaped vessel with one handle rising vertically from the rim and terminating in a molded form resembling a human face; lower portion of vessel tapers inward to a flat base; buff earthenware lightly burnished and decorated with geometric designs painted in dark brown slip before firing; painted designs include a large lozenge shape with fishnet pattern, circles, dots, and undulating lines. Majiayao culture, Majiayao type. From the upper Yellow River valley region; Gansu, Qinghai, or Ningxia province.

  • Cup with handle

    Cup with handle

    Bowl-shaped cup with one strap handle attached from rim to midsection; coarse buff earthenware with geometric decoration painted in black slip. Xindian culture. From the upper Yellow River valley region; Gansu, Qinghai, or Ningxia province.

  • Jug with “owl-head” top

    Jug with “owl-head” top

    Pouring vessel with ovoid body, short handle attached from rim to shoulder, and top in the form of a face with two eyes and an open mouth, said to resemble the head of an owl; buff earthenware with dark fire markings and with incised and applique decoration. Qijia culture. From the upper Yellow River valley region; Gansu, Qinghai, or Shaanxi province or Inner Mongolia.

  • Rounded bowl

    Rounded bowl

    Deep hemispherical bowl with lower portion tapering inward to a slightly flattened convex base; red earthenware lightly burnished and decorated on the exterior around the lip with a wide band painted in a light-colored slip before firing; whitish encrustations from burial. Early Yangshao culture, Banpo type. From the middle Yellow River valley region, Shaanxi province.

  • Wide-mouthed jar with two strap handles

    Wide-mouthed jar with two strap handles

    Small globular jar with constricted neck, wide body, lower portion tapering inward to a small, flat base, and with two strap handles attached from rim to shoulders; buff earthenware with geometric decoration painted in black slip on the rim, neck, body, and handles; small white shell fragments inlaid into dots of black adhesive around the neck and at the ends of the handles. Siba culture. From the upper Yellow River valley region, probably Gansu province.

  • Broad-shouldered jar

    Broad-shouldered jar

    Ovoid jar with short, cylindrical neck, broad shoulders, sides tapering inward to a small, flat base, and two strap lug handles positioned bilaterally just below the shoulder; buff earthenware lightly burnished and decorated with geometric designs painted in black and burgundy slips before firing. Majiayao culture, Banshan type. From the upper Yellow River valley region; Gansu, Qinghai, or Ningxia province.

  • Long-necked jar

    Long-necked jar

    Ovoid jar with flared lip, cylindrical neck, broad shoulders, sides tapering inward to a flat base, and two lug handles beneath shoulders; buff earthenware with geometric decoration painted in black slip and white pigment. Majiayao culture, Majiayao type. From the upper Yellow River valley region; Gansu, Qinghai, or Ningxia province.

  • Double-handled jar

    Double-handled jar

    Jar with curved, “saddle-shaped” mouth, broad shoulders, sides tapering inward to a small, flat base, and two strap handles attached from rim to top of shoulders; gray earthenware with irregular markings from firing. Siwa culture. From the upper Yellow River valley region; Gansu of Shaanxi province.

  • Jar with cord-marked decor

    Jar with cord-marked decor

    Jar with trumpet-shaped, flared mouth, constricted neck, ovoid body, and two loop handles; reddish buff earthenware with applique handles and cord-impressed decoration. Qijia culture. From the upper Yellow River valley region; Gansu, Qinghai, or Shaanxi province or Inner Mongolia.

  • Bird-shaped jar

    Bird-shaped jar

    Compressed, wide-bodied jar with open mouth, short, cylindrical, off-center neck, rounded shoulders, sides tapering inward to a small, flat base, two strap lug handles, and a small, wide tab below the shoulder, opposite the mouth and neck; buff earthenware lightly burnished and decorated with geometric designs painted in black slip before firing; decoration on the shoulders includes two large round cartouches, one with small squares and crosshatched rhombuses, the other with large dots set within a grid of crosshatched bands. Majiayao culture, Machang type. From the upper Yellow River valley region; Gansu, Qinghai, or Ningxia province. This type of jar is said to resemble a squat waterfowl, with the jar’s neck, lug handles, and tab representing a bird’s head, wings, and tail, respectively.

  • Jar with anthropomorphic feet

    Jar with anthropomorphic feet

    Small jar with short, constricted neck, globular body, two booted human feet, and two strap handles; gray earthenware with applique handles and feet and cord-impressed decoration. Qijia culture. From the upper Yellow River valley region; Gansu, Qinghai, or Shaanxi province or Inner Mongolia. Note: A sample taken from the handle of this vessel was thermoluminescence (TL) tested at Oxford Authentication Ltd. in November 1999 and determined to be consistent with the suggested period of manufacture.

  • Broad-shouldered jar

    Broad-shouldered jar

    Ovoid jar with short neck, broad rounded shoulders, sides tapering inward to a small, flat base, and two strap lug handles positioned bilaterally below the shoulder; buff earthenware with geometric decoration painted in black and burgundy slips; decoration around the shoulders includes four large round cartouches containing rings of dotted circles surrounding a smaller circle of crosshatching. Majiayao culture, Machang type. From the upper Yellow River valley region; Gansu, Qinghai, or Ningxia province.

  • Ovoid Storage Jar with Two Lug Handles, with Short Neck and Flaring Lip, and with Abstract Spiral Decor

    Ovoid Storage Jar with Two Lug Handles, with Short Neck and Flaring Lip, and with Abstract Spiral Decor

  • Ovoid Jar with Two Loop Handles and Short, Flaring Neck, and with Geometric Decor

    Ovoid Jar with Two Loop Handles and Short, Flaring Neck, and with Geometric Decor

  • Spouted jug

    Spouted jug

    Pouring vessel with tubular spout, ovoid body, and two short handles attached from rim to shoulder; light gray earthenware with incised and cord-impressed decoration. Qijia culture. From the upper Yellow River valley region; Gansu, Qinghai, or Shaanxi province or Inner Mongolia.

  • Long-necked jar

    Long-necked jar

    Globular vessel with flared lip, long cylindrical neck, sloping shoulders, broad midsection, and lower body tapering inward to a flat base; buff earthenware lightly burnished and decorated on the exterior with abstract designs painted in black slip; painted designs on body and neck include three large lozenge shaped medallions enclosing a fishnet pattern on the body, each surrounded by curvilinear triangles, arcs, lines, and dotted circles. From the upper Yellow River valley region, Gansu or Qinghai province. Note: A sample taken from the base of this vessel was thermoluminescence (TL) tested at Oxford Authentication Ltd. in October 2001 and determined to be consistent with the suggested period of manufacture.

  • Basin

    Basin

    Circular basin with everted rim, slightly rounded sides, and lower body tapering inward to a flat base; buff earthenware lightly burnished and decorated with geometric designs painted in dark brown slip before firing; painted designs include concentric circles radiating outward from a single dot at the center with additional dots at regular intervals (on the interior), curved arcs and diagonal lines (on top of the rim), and wavy lines with feather-like flourishes (on the exterior). Majiayao culture, Majiayao type. From the upper Yellow River valley region; Gansu, Qinghai, or Ningxia province.

  • Small jar with strap handle

    Small jar with strap handle

    Small jar with bulbous body, lower portion tapering inward to a small, flat base, and with single strap handle; light gray earthenware with applique handle and impressed decoration forming vertical ribs on the body. Majiayao culture, Banshan type. From the upper Yellow River valley region; southern Ningxia province.

  • Double-handled jar

    Double-handled jar

    Large jar with curved, “saddle-shaped” mouth with oval cross-section, broad shoulders, sides tapering inward to a small, flat base, and two strap handles attached from rim to top of shoulders; red earthenware with dark gray irregular markings from firing. Siwa culture. From the upper Yellow River valley region; Gansu of Shaanxi province.

  • Spouted jugSpouted jug

    Spouted jugSpouted jug

    Pouring vessel with angular neck, ovoid body, short, tubular spout, and triangular opening; buff earthenware. Qijia culture. From the upper Yellow River valley region; Gansu, Qinghai, or Shaanxi province or Inner Mongolia.

  • Small jar with tab handle

    Small jar with tab handle

    Small jar with bulbous body, lower portion tapering inward to a small, flat base, and with small tab handle; light gray earthenware with applique handle and impressed decoration forming a chevron pattern on the shoulders. Majiayao culture, Banshan type. From the upper Yellow River valley region; southern Ningxia province.

  • Broad-shouldered jar

    Broad-shouldered jar

    Ovoid jar with short neck, broad rounded shoulders, sides tapering inward to a small, flat base, and two strap lug handles positioned bilaterally below the shoulder; buff earthenware with geometric decoration painted in black and burgundy slips; decoration around the shoulders includes designs of stylized headless anthropomorphic figures alternating with round cartouches of crosshatched patterns. Majiayao culture, Machang type. From the upper Yellow River valley region; Gansu, Qinghai, or Ningxia province.

  • Amphora with pointed base

    Amphora with pointed base

    Inverted tear-drop-shaped vessel with cupped mouth, short neck, broad, rounded shoulders, sides tapering inward to a pointed base, and two loop handles just below shoulders; red earthenware, the upper half cord-marked (i.e., textured with impressions created by a cord-wrapped implement tapped against the moist clay before firing. Early Yangshao culture, Banpo type. Vessels of this form—with small mouths, pointed bases, and bilateral loop handles—were used to collect and carry water and were produced in abundance during the middle and late Neolithic period in the middle Yellow River valley region. Note: A sample taken from the base of this vessel was thermoluminescence (TL) tested at Oxford Authentication Ltd. in September 1998 and determined to be consistent with the suggested period of manufacture.

  • Amphora with flat base

    Amphora with flat base

    Tall, elongated vessel with small, bell-shaped mouth, narrow neck, sloping shoulders, slightly rounded midsection, sides tapering inward to a flat, circular base, and two strap handles forming loops just below shoulders; reddish buff earthenware textured with abstract linear designs from neck to foot, created by combing and scraping the moist clay surface before firing; mottled with dark patches. Yangshao culture, Miaodigou type. From the upper or middle Yellow River valley regions, possibly Shaanxi or eastern Gansu province.

  • Conjoined jars

    Conjoined jars

    Small twin jars with short necks, globular bodies, and strap loop handles, the jars joined at the body, with an opening between them on the interior; buff earthenware with geometric decoration painted in orange-red slip. Qijia culture. From the upper Yellow River valley region; Gansu, Qinghai, or Shaanxi province or Inner Mongolia.

  • Basin with two anthropomorphic handles

    Basin with two anthropomorphic handles

    Small circular basin with two arching handles rising upward from the rim, each terminating in a molded form resembling a human face; lower portion of vessel tapers inward to a flat base; buff earthenware lightly burnished and decorated with geometric designs painted in dark brown slip before firing; painted designs include dotted concentric circles and undulating lines; a faint grid-like pattern of lines painted on the base. Majiayao culture, Majiayao type. From the upper Yellow River valley region; Gansu, Qinghai, or Ningxia province.

  • Wide-mouthed jar

    Wide-mouthed jar

    Globular jar with indented neck, broad body, lower portion tapering inward to a small, flat base, and with two strap handles attached from rim to shoulders; buff earthenware with crosshatched decoration painted in black slip on neck and body. Siba culture. From the upper Yellow River valley region, probably Gansu province.

  • Small jar with anthropomorphic cover

    Small jar with anthropomorphic cover

    Small ovoid jar with two lug handles, zigzag mouth opening, and fitted cover with knob in the form of a human head; buff earthenware with geometric decoration painted in black slip. Majiayao culture, Banshan type. From the upper Yellow River valley region; Gansu, Qinghai, or Ningxia province.

  • Small jar with strap handle

    Small jar with strap handle

    Small jar with bulbous body, lower portion tapering inward to a flat base, and with single strap handle; buff earthenware with applique handle and applique decoration forming diagonal lines of dashes across the body. Majiayao culture, Banshan type. From the upper Yellow River valley region; southern Ningxia province.

  • Small jar with tab handle

    Small jar with tab handle

    Small jar with bulbous body, lower portion tapering inward to a small, flat base, and with small tab handle; light gray earthenware with applique handle and applique and impressed decoration forming diagonal lines on the shoulders. Majiayao culture, Banshan type. From the upper Yellow River valley region; southern Ningxia province.

  • Small jar with three strap handles

    Small jar with three strap handles

    Small hourglass-shaped jar with flared mouth, constricted waist, and flared lower half; with three strap handles attached from lip to base; thinly potted red earthenware with applique handles and traces of cinnabar. Qijia culture. From the upper Yellow River valley region; Gansu, Qinghai, or Shaanxi province or Inner Mongolia.

  • Small animal-form rattle

    Small animal-form rattle

    Small rattle with finial in the form of an animal head with pointed ears and muzzle, a long stem representing the animal’s neck, and a globular hollow body with flat base containing rattle elements; with two small circular perforations (one near the base of the neck, the other in the center of the flat base) to prevent the object from exploding when fired; buff earthenware with applique elements. Qijia culture. From the upper Yellow River valley region; Gansu, Qinghai, or Shaanxi province or Inner Mongolia.

  • Wide-mouthed jar with pointed base

    Wide-mouthed jar with pointed base

    Deep pear-shaped vessel with lightly flared thickened lip, rounded bottom, and flattened conical projection at base; red earthenware lightly burnished on the exterior and decorated with a chevron-pattern painted in black slip before firing; interior with encrustations of earth from burial. Early middle Yangshao culture, Shijia type. From the middle Yellow River valley region, Shaanxi province.

  • Bird-shaped jar
  • Bottle
  • Spouted jug with anthropomorphic top
  • Covered Jar
  • Jar cord marked decor
  • Large, Ovoid Jar with Cylindrical Neck, Flaring Lip, Two Loop Handles, and Geometric Decoration of So-called
  • Wide-mouthed jar
  • Miniature Jar with anthropomorphic cover Miniature Jar with anthropomorphic cover
  • Wide-mouthed jar with pictorial decoration
  • Wide-mouthed jar with two strap handles
  • Double-handled jar
  • Basin
  • Small, Compressed Globular Vessel with Lightly Flaring Spout, Strap Handle, and Animal-Head Decor
  • Amphora with Flaring Mouth and Two Lug Handles and with Cord-Marked Decor
  • Small jar with handle
  • Small spouted jar with handle
  • Wide mouthed jar
  • Rounded bowl
  • Zoomorphic figurine
  • Basin with anthropomorphic handle
  • Cup with handle
  • Jug with “owl-head” top
  • Rounded bowl
  • Wide-mouthed jar with two strap handles
  • Broad-shouldered jar
  • Long-necked jar
  • Double-handled jar
  • Jar with cord-marked decor
  • Bird-shaped jar
  • Jar with anthropomorphic feet
  • Broad-shouldered jar
  • Ovoid Storage Jar with Two Lug Handles, with Short Neck and Flaring Lip, and with Abstract Spiral Decor
  • Ovoid Jar with Two Loop Handles and Short, Flaring Neck, and with Geometric Decor
  • Spouted jug
  • Long-necked jar
  • Basin
  • Small jar with strap handle
  • Double-handled jar
  • Spouted jugSpouted jug
  • Small jar with tab handle
  • Broad-shouldered jar
  • Amphora with pointed base
  • Amphora with flat base
  • Conjoined jars
  • Basin with two anthropomorphic handles
  • Wide-mouthed jar
  • Small jar with anthropomorphic cover
  • Small jar with strap handle
  • Small jar with tab handle
  • Small jar with three strap handles
  • Small animal-form rattle
  • Wide-mouthed jar with pointed base
University Study Gallery, Harvard Art Museums

Ancient pottery vessels are not only works of art but also representations of technical achievement, products of economic value, and windows into ancient history and society. This installation showcases approximately 60 excellent, yet rarely seen prehistoric Chinese ceramics from the collections of the Harvard Art Museums and the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology.

This installation complements a course taught by Rowan Flad, the John E. Hudson Professor of Archaeology at Harvard University, and has been organized with Ling-yu Hung, the An Wang Postdoctoral Fellow at the Harvard Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies and assistant professor of anthropology at Indiana University in Bloomington.

The installation is made possible in part by funding from the Gurel Student Exhibition Fund and the José Soriano Fund at the Harvard Art Museums, as well as support from the Harvard Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies.

The University Study Gallery supports the coursework of numerous Harvard departments and schools. It is a gallery classroom dedicated to the installation of original works of art that serve as primary source materials for interdisciplinary study.

Related Programming

Information about gallery talks related to Prehistoric Pottery from Northwest China can be found in our calendar: www.harvardartmuseums.org/calendar. Additionally, the Society for East Asian Archaeology (SEAA) hold their seventh worldwide conference in Cambridge and Boston (at Harvard and Boston Universities) on June 8 to 12, 2016, organized by Rowan Flad of Harvard University and Robert Murowchick of Boston University: www.seaa-web.org/conf16-pre.htm