Christopher Wilmarth: Drawing into Sculpture

, Harvard University Art Museums, Fogg Art Museum
  • Nine sketches for
  • Sketch for
  • Maquette for
  • The Whole Soul Summed Up
  • Reclining figure; verso: blank
  • Sculpture specification: Calling (front view), 1974
  • Sculpture specification, Milan 1973: Normal Corner (New)
  • Maquette for sculpture (version of
  • Maquette for sculpture (version of
  • Untitled
  • Three Drawings for Calling
  • When Winter on forgotten woods moves somber...
  • Sigh
  • Toast
  • Experimentation on fabric; verso: blank
  • Sculpture specification: Calling (top view), 1974
  • Sculpture specification: Calling (?), 1974
  • Maquette for sculpture, 1973
  • Maquette for
  • Calling
  • Saint
  • Platform Dream #11
  • Three Drawings for Calling
  • Insert myself within your story...
  • Shifrah
  • Title Page of
  • Sketch for
  • Sculpture specification: Calling (side view), 1974
  • Maquette for
  • Maquette for
  • Maquette for sculpture (version of
  • Calling
  • My old books closed...
  • Saint
  • Sketches for sculpture; verso: blank
  • Maquette for
  • Yolande
  • Platform Dream #5
  • Invitation #1
  • Three Drawings for Calling
  • Stream
On View Harvard University Art Museums, Fogg Art Museum

Christopher Wilmarth (1943–1987) is best known for creating glass and steel sculptures of an enthralling formal beauty and profound poetic sensibility. One key to the vitality of these works was his grasp of the possibilities of drawing, which led to some of the most fascinating and innovative sculptors’ drawings of the last 35 years. Comprising more than 50 works, Christopher Wilmarth: Drawing into Sculpture reflects Wilmarth’s wide embrace of drawing and focuses not only on drawing as traditionally defined but also on his overall concept of the medium and its realization both on paper and in sculpture.

The exhibition illuminates three aspects of Wilmarth’s drawings. The first is the role of drawing in his preparatory process and focuses on his sketchbooks, maquettes, and technical specification sheets. The second section highlights five of the artist’s glass and steel cable “drawings” from the early 1970s and addresses how the traditional distinctions between drawing and sculpture became blurred and ultimately erased altogether in his work. The final part concentrates on the independent drawings Wilmarth made directly after, or in association with, his sculptures as a means to think through the completed work and to look forward to new creative ideas.

Organized by Edward Saywell, Charles C. Cunningham, Sr., Curatorial Associate, Drawings Department.

Funded by the Fifth Floor Foundation, Keith and Katherine Sachs, Carol and Sol LeWitt, Agnes Gund, and Daniel Shapiro.