No Image
Identification and Creation
Object Number
2006.77
People
Jim Dine, American (Cincinnati, Ohio 1935 -)
Printed by Kelpra Studio
Published by Editions Alecto, London
Title
A Tool Box
Classification
Prints
Work Type
portfolio
Date
1966
Culture
American
Physical Descriptions
Medium
Red acrylic plastic portfolio box, title page, and ten screenprints with collaged elements: nine on various papers (one mounted on board) and one on plastic sheet
Technique
Screen print and collage
Dimensions
portfolio case: 60.96 x 48.26 x 3.81 cm (24 x 19 x 1 1/2 in.)
sheet: 60.3 x 47.9 cm (23 3/4 x 18 7/8 in.)
Inscriptions and Marks
  • Signed: Each sheet signed in pencil
  • inscription: each sheet signed in pencil, recto; numbered in pencil, verso
State, Edition, Standard Reference Number
Edition
26/150
Standard Reference Number
Mikro 42a-j
Acquisition and Rights
Credit Line
Harvard Art Museums/Fogg Museum, Margaret Fisher Fund
Copyright
© Jim DIne / Artist Rights Society (ARS), New York
Accession Year
2006
Object Number
2006.77
Division
Modern and Contemporary Art
Contact
am_moderncontemporary@harvard.edu
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Descriptions
Commentary
Jim Dine's interest in tools is customarily attributed to his working in his grandfather's and then father's hardware store. Certainly tools were ideal instruments for representation in the new Pop lexicon of everyday objects. The tools depicted in "A Tool Box" were cut out of industrial design magazines and engineering textbooks and then screenprinted onto ten different surfaces, ranging from white paper to clear acetate to silver mylar to blue graph paper. Drawing on the model of Rauschenberg's combines, Dine then collaged objects to the prints. A comic absurdity pervades the depiction and the deployment of the tool, as well as the combination of elements in the compositions. For instance, four hammers are depicted above a huge pair of red lips.
Related Works

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