Lyonel Feininger: Photographs

Berlin, 1933-1937

Berlin, 1933-1937

Lyonel Feininger

Harvard Art Museums/Busch-Reisinger Museum

Lyonel Feininger

Harvard Art Museums/Busch-Reisinger Museum

Lyonel Feininger

Harvard Art Museums/Busch-Reisinger Museum

Lyonel Feininger

Harvard Art Museums/Busch-Reisinger Museum

Lyonel Feininger

Harvard Art Museums/Busch-Resinger Museum

Lyonel Feininger

Harvard Art Museums/Busch-Reisinger Museum

Lyonel Feininger

Harvard Art Museums/Busch-Reisinger Museum

Lyonel Feininger

Harvard Art Museums/Busch-Reisinger Museum

In the autumn of 1933, a year after the Nazis closed the Dessau Bauhaus, the Feiningers moved to the Berlin suburb of Siemensstadt, where they stayed with friends before eventually renting an apartment on Lenthersteigstrasse. Feininger continued to photograph, either in the confines of his own home, often from the window of his second-floor apartment, or taking his camera out into the streets. Since he lacked darkroom facilities, few prints exist from this period, but many negatives survive: some depict schoolchildren and local vendors on the sidewalks of Siemensstadt, while others document more disturbing scenes, such as a Nazi parade and swastika flags hanging from the balconies of nearby apartments.

During his stay in Berlin, Feininger visited the idyllic villages of Berlin-Stölpchensee and Bernau, as well as the nearby city of Potsdam. His photographs of Potsdam record well-known landmarks such as the Palace of Sanssouci, the City Palace, and the Garnison Church, many of which were partially or completely destroyed during World War II.