Past Exhibitions

Education

Africans in Black and White: Images of Blacks in 16th- and 17th-Century Prints


Wed, 09/01/2010 - 20:00 -- wds
Africans in Black and White: Images of Blacks in 16th- and 17th-Century Prints
September 2, 2010—December 3, 2010 W. E. B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research, Harvard University

Jan Muller, after Hendrick Goltzius, Creation of the World: Separation of Light and Darkness, 1589, Harvard Art Museums/Fogg Museum.

Figures of black Africans are a common but often disregarded presence in European works of art, especially in Renaissance and Baroque prints. This exhibition, which is drawn mostly from the Harvard Art Museums’ collections, shows the roles they occupy, most prominently in representations of the adoration of the magi and the baptism of the (Ethiopian) eunuch, and as bystanders in other biblical scenes. Artists include Albrecht Dürer, Hendrick Goltzius, Rembrandt, and Peter Paul Rubens. Held in conjunction with the publication by Harvard University Press of the first books in the series The Image of the Black in Western Art, edited by David Bindman, Emeritus Professor of the History of Art, University College London, and a 2010 Sheila Biddle Ford Foundation Fellow, W. E. B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research, Harvard University; and Henry Louis Gates Jr., Alphonse Fletcher University Professor, Harvard University, and Director of the W. E. B. Du Bois Institute. Curated by Bindman and Anna Knaap, former Theodore Rousseau Postdoctoral Fellow, Division of European and American Art, Harvard Art Museums, and current Visiting Fellow, Jesuit Institute, Boston College. Organized by the W. E. B. Du Bois Institute.

Rudenstine Gallery, W. E. B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research, Harvard University, 104 Mount Auburn Street 3R, Cambridge, MA