Untitled [With Anna May Wong]
© President and Fellows of Harvard College
Identification and Creation
Object Number
2006.25
People
Marianne Brandt, German (Chemnitz, Germany 1893 - 1983 Kirchberg, Germany)
Title
Untitled [with Anna May Wong]
Classification
Photographs
Work Type
photograph, photomontage
Date
1929
Culture
German
Physical Descriptions
Medium
Photomontage of newspaper clippings with glass, celluloid and metal on off-white cardboard
Technique
Collage
Dimensions
67 x 50 cm (26 3/8 x 19 11/16 in.)
Provenance
Collection of the artist, gift; to Hajo Rose. Galerie Ulrich Fiedler, sold; to Eckhard Neumann. Rudolf Kicken Gallery, sold; to Thomas Walther. Private Collection, sold [through Rudolf Kicken Gallery] to Busch-Reisinger Museum.

FN: Hajo Rose and Brandt were students together at the Bauhaus.


Acquisition and Rights
Credit Line
Harvard Art Museums/Busch-Reisinger Museum, Purchase through the generosity of the Friends of the Busch-Reisinger Museum and their Acquisitions Committee, Richard and Priscilla Hunt, Elizabeth C. Lyman, Mildred Rendl-Marcus, and Sylvia de Cuevas
Copyright
© Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Accession Year
2006
Object Number
2006.25
Division
Modern and Contemporary Art
Contact
am_moderncontemporary@harvard.edu
Descriptions

Label Text: 32Q: 1520 Art in Germany Between the Wars (Interwar and Bauhaus) , written 2014
Brandt, best known for the small household objects she designed in the Bauhaus metal workshop (see her 1924 samovar in this gallery), also experimented with photography and photomontage. She was greatly influenced by the photographic work of László Moholy-Nagy, her teacher and the director of the metal workshop. Brandt assembled about fifty photomontages between 1924 and 1931. This work, made the year she left the school, incorporates an image of the Hollywood film star Anna May Wong and other exemplars of female beauty. Exceptional for both its large size and its complexity, it wittily and provocatively addresses many of Brandt’s key themes: the image of women in a mass-media culture, the role of woman as artist, and the appeal of beauty and the exotic. Through her inclusion of a lens-like piece of glass and sheet of celluloid, she also references the tools and materials of photography and film.

Publication History

Wulf Herzogenrath, Bauhaus Utopien: Arbeiten auf Papier, Cantz'sche Druckerei (Stuttgart, 1988), p. 66

Elizabeth Otto, "Figuring Gender: Photomontage and Cultural Critique in Germany's Weimar Republic: Dissertation" (2003), University of Michigan, pp. 143-145, 319

Elizabeth Otto, Tempo, Tempo! The Bauhaus Photomontages of Marianne Brandt, exh. cat., Bauhaus-Archiv and jovis Verlag (Berlin, 2005), pp. 104-105, 173

Peter Nisbet and Joseph Koerner, The Busch-Reisinger Museum, Harvard University Art Museums, ed. Peter Nisbet, Harvard University Art Museums and Scala Publishers Ltd. (Cambridge, MA and London, England, 2007), p. 117

Exhibition History

Tempo! Tempo! The Bauhaus Photomontages of Marianne Brandt, Bauhaus-Archiv, 10/12/2005 - 01/09/2006; Busch-Reisinger Museum, Cambridge, 03/11/2006 - 05/21/2006; International Center of Photography, 06/09/2006 - 08/27/2006

HAA 1 Survey Course (S421): Landmarks of World Art and Architecture (Spring 2010), Harvard Art Museums/Arthur M. Sackler Museum, Cambridge, 02/05/2010 - 05/09/2010

32Q: 1520 Art in Germany Between the Wars (Interwar and Bauhaus), Harvard Art Museums, Cambridge, 11/01/2014 - 03/06/2015

Subjects and Contexts

Collection Highlights

The Bauhaus

Verification Level

3 - Good. Object is well described and information is vetted