© President and Fellows of Harvard College
Identification and Creation
Object Number
2009.58
People
F. Benedict Herzog, American (New York City 1859 - 1912)
Title
Angela
Classification
Photographs
Work Type
photograph
Date
1905
Culture
American
Physical Descriptions
Technique
Photogravure
Dimensions
20.9 x 17.2 cm (8 1/4 x 6 3/4 in.)
sheet: 30.4 x 21 cm (11 15/16 x 8 1/4 in.)
Acquisition and Rights
Credit Line
Harvard Art Museums/Fogg Museum, Gift of Paula and Mack Lee
Accession Year
2009
Object Number
2009.58
Division
European and American Art
Contact
am_europeanamerican@harvard.edu
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Descriptions
Commentary
Published in Camera Work, no. 12 (1905). Several of Herzog's works, including "The Banks of Lethe" and "Twixt the Cup and the Lip," were included in Camera Work, no. 17 (January 1907), and a copy of this issue is also in the Fogg's photography holdings.

Label Text: 32Q: 2100 19th Century , written 2015
The pictorialist movement of the late 19th and early 20th centuries sought to elevate photography to the status of high art at a time when its practice was made ubiquitous through the invention of the Kodak pointand-shoot camera in the 1880s. Responding to what they saw as a dilution of aesthetic quality, photographers began to transform their images through photographic experimentation, including soft focus, subtlety in tonal variation, and unusual compositions.

In the United States, pictorialism was represented by the Photo-Secession, founded in 1902 by Alfred Stieglitz, Clarence White, Gertrude Käsebier, and Edward Steichen. The group’s quarterly journal, "Camera Work," was “devoted to the furtherance of high quality photography.” This photogravure by Herzog was reproduced in the journal in 1905. A contemporary critic hailed Herzog for mastering the “crushed and crumpled drapery of the Pre-Raphaelites, the pompous style of the Venetians with its broad planes of shining velvet, [and] the pliable, soft, stunning effects of a Reynolds or a Gainsborough.”

Exhibition History

32Q: 2100 19th Century, Harvard Art Museums, Cambridge, 03/04/2015 - 09/17/2015

Subjects and Contexts

Collection Highlights

Google Art Project

This record has been reviewed by the curatorial staff but may be incomplete. Our records are frequently revised and enhanced. For more information please contact the Division of European and American Art at am_europeanamerican@harvard.edu