Michel Lepelletier
© President and Fellows of Harvard College
Identification and Creation
Object Number
M10326
People
Pierre Michel Alix, French (France 1762 - 1817 France)
After Jean-François Garneray, French (Paris 1755 - 1837 Paris)
Mat by Alexandre Jouanest, French
Title
Michel Lepelletier
Classification
Prints
Work Type
print
Date
1794
Places
Creation Place: Europe, France, Paris
Culture
French
Location
Level 2, Room 2220, European and American Art, 17th–19th century, Rococo and Neoclassicism in the Eighteenth Century
View this object's location on our interactive map
Physical Descriptions
Medium
Wash manner printed in yellow, blue, red, and black
Technique
Wash manner
Dimensions
sheet (oval): 30.5 x 25.6 cm (12 x 10 1/16 in.)
image (oval): 24.8 x 20.9 cm (9 3/4 x 8 1/4 in.)
18th-century mat: 38.4 x 34.3 cm (15 1/8 x 13 1/2 in.)
Inscriptions and Marks
  • label: verso of mat: Place de la Borde, No. 2, près / St-Augustin / ALEXANDRE / JOUANEST / DOREUR / Fabricant de bordures dorées / our tableaux, estampes, glaces, gouaches et des- / sins, et se charge de l'encadrement. / A PARIS.
State, Edition, Standard Reference Number
State
ii/ii
Standard Reference Number
M.40, BNIFF 45 (18th century, vol. I), DeVinck 5037
Acquisition and Rights
Credit Line
Harvard Art Museums/Fogg Museum, Bequest of Grenville L. Winthrop
Object Number
M10326
Division
European and American Art
Contact
am_europeanamerican@harvard.edu
Descriptions
Description
With 18th-century mat, watercolor and gold, by Alexandre Jouanest

Label Text: 32Q: 2220 18th-19th Century , written 2014

Louis-Michel Lepelletier de Saint-Fargeau (1760–1793), the controller general of finances under Louis XVI, was fatally stabbed after he voted for the king’s execution. This medallion portrait of the French Revolutionary hero was part of Pierre Michel Alix’s series of prints depicting French luminaries. Alix was renowned for his skill in producing exquisite color prints; like the architectural view hanging nearby, this work is not only printed in four colors, but was created in a combination of techniques known as “wash manner,” which included the use of aquatint. The frame, painted in watercolor and gold to imitate marble, was made by the professional framer Alexandre Jouanest, which attests to the importance ascribed to this kind of print in the late eighteenth century.

Exhibition History

Ancient to Modern, Harvard Art Museums, Cambridge, 01/31/2012 - 06/01/2013

32Q: 2220 18th-19th Century, Harvard Art Museums, Cambridge, 09/13/2016 - 01/05/2017

This record was created from historic documentation and may not have been reviewed by a curator; it may be inaccurate or incomplete. Our records are frequently revised and enhanced. For more information please contact the Division of European and American Art at am_europeanamerican@harvard.edu