Master And Pupil (Perhaps Prince Salim, Later Emperor Jahangir, With His Tutor)
© President and Fellows of Harvard College
Identification and Creation
Object Number
2009.202.204
People
Attributed to Aqa Riza Jahangiri, Afghan
Title
Master and Pupil (perhaps Prince Salim, later Emperor Jahangir, with his tutor)
Classification
Drawings
Work Type
drawing
Date
late 16th century
Places
Creation Place: South Asia, India
Period
Mughal period
Culture
Mughal
Physical Descriptions
Medium
Black ink and opaque watercolor on beige paper
Dimensions
26.2 x 16.5 cm (10 5/16 x 6 1/2 in.)
Provenance
Stuart Cary Welch (by 1969 - 2008,) by descent; to his estate (2008-2009,) gift; to Harvard Art Museum.

Notes:
Object was part of temporary loan to Museum in 1969.
Aquisition and Rights
Credit Line
Harvard Art Museums/Arthur M. Sackler Museum, The Stuart Cary Welch Collection, Gift of Edith I. Welch in memory of Stuart Cary Welch
Accession Year
2009
Object Number
2009.202.204
Division
Asian and Mediterranean Art
Contact
am_asianmediterranean@harvard.edu
Descriptions
Description
With sensitive, calligraphic lines, this drawing depicts an elegantly dressed youth kneeling with uplifted face before his much larger master, who is holding open a book with faintly visible, but illegible script. Fine and subtle strokes delineate the master's beard and fur collar and the youth's aigrette and curling hair. Folds of drapery at the hem of their robes and edges of their shawls break into lively rhythms.

Label Text: Precisely to the Point, Daggers and Drawings from Persia and India: 15th-19th century, written 1992
Schoolmaster and Pupil (Prince Selim?)
Attributable to Aqa Reza Jahangiri
India, Mughal, ca. 1585
Ink and watercolor on paper
Private collection
242 .1983

Label Text: Linear Graces ... and Disgraces: Part II, Drawings from the Courts of Persia, Turkey, and India, 15th-19th Centuries, written 1994
Master and Pupil
Attributable to Aqa-Riza Jahangiri
India, Mughal, ca. 1585
Brush and ink on paper
Private collection
242.1983

Probably unrelated to the Safavid artist of the same name, Aqa-Riza Jahangiri emigrated from Iran to the Mughal court, where he flourished under two emperors,
Akbar the Great (r. 1557-1605) and his son, Jahangir (r. 1605-27). Evident here is his turn from the otherworldly Safavid elegances in which he was trained to the observed, palpable realities admired at the Mughal court. Through deftly calligraphic flourishes, our eyes are drawn to the pupil (probably Prince Salim, who reigned as Jahangir) and to his teacher, sympathetically seen as a genial teddy bear.

Label Text: From Infancy to Old Age, A Gallery of Indians, written 1993
Prince Salim (reigned as Jahangir, 1605-27) and His Teacher
Attributable to Aqa Reza Jahangiri
Mughal (Lahore?), ca. 1583
Reed pen, brush, and ink
242.1983

Prince Salim's devotion to the art of painting must have appealed to the Persian-born artist, who drew his sensitive portrait as a dutiful student at the knee of a burly and dedicated schoolmaster. We have seen few more perceptive depictions of Indian studenthood.

Label Text: Anvari's Divan: A Pocket Book for Akbar, written 1984
21. A Prince
India, Mughal, c.1550
Private Collection 243.1983

Label Text: The Tablet and the Pen: Drawings from the Islamic World, written 2006
Master and Pupil
Attributed to Aqa Riza Jahangiri
India, Mughal, late 16th century
Black ink, red watercolor, and white gouache on tan paper
Promised gift of Stuart Cary Welch Jr ., 242.1983
No. 12

Aqa Riza Jahangiri, by birth and training a Persian artist, spent most of his adult life working at the Mughal court. This work exhibits the effects of a changed context on the production of a figural type. The figures' flowing robes feature a sinuous and calligraphic quality characteristic of Safavid drawing. Yet the articulation and modeling of individualized facial features, stem from a naturalistic style developed at the Mughal court during the reign of the emperor Akbar (r. 1556-1605) and continued by his son and successor Jahangir (r. 1605-27).
This work also demonstrates how typologies rehearsed and developed in single-figure drawings were incorporated into compositions: the dervish holding a book and seated next to a young boy establishes the relationship of a master to his pupil, a common subject in the visual arts of Iran and India.

Publication History

Asia Society, The Art of Mughal India: Painting & Precious Objects, exh. cat., Harry N. Abrams, Inc. (New York, NY, 1963), Page 164/Figure 17

Stuart Cary Welch, "Mughal and Deccani Miniature Paintings From a Private Collection", Freer Gallery of Art / Smithsonian Institution (Washington, D.C., 1963), Plate 1/Figure 2

Michael Brand, Akbar's India: Art from the Mughal City of Victory, exh. cat., Asia Society Galleries (New York, NY, 1985), Page 79 & 147/Figure 42

Stuart Cary Welch and Kim Masteller, From Mind, Heart, and Hand: Persian, Turkish, and Indian Drawings from the Stuart Cary Welch Collection, exh. cat., Yale University Press (U.S.) (New Haven, 2004), p 11/ fig 9, p 80 - 81/ cat 17

Exhibition History

Anvari's Divan: A Pocket Book for Akbar, Fogg Art Museum, Cambridge, 02/07/1984 - 03/28/1984

Akbar's India: Art from the Mughal City of Victory, Harvard University Art Museums, Cambridge, 01/24/1986 - 03/16/1986

Indian and Persian Drawings, Harvard University Art Museums, Cambridge, 04/25/1987 - 06/21/1987

Precisely to the Point, Daggers and Drawings from Persia and India: 15th-19th century, Harvard University Art Museums, Cambridge, 05/30/1992 - 07/26/1992

Infancy to Old Age: A Gallery of Indians, Harvard University Art Museums, Cambridge, 02/27/1993 - 04/25/1993

Linear Graces ... and Disgraces: Part II, Drawings from the Courts of Persia, Turkey, and India, 15th-19th Centuries, Harvard University Art Museums, Cambridge, 12/26/1994 - 03/05/1995

From Mind, Heart, and Hand: Persian, Turkish, and Indian Drawings from SCWelch, Harvard University Art Museums, Fogg Art Museum, Cambridge, 03/19/2005 - 06/02/2005

The Tablet and the Pen: Drawings from the Islamic World, Harvard University Art Museums, Arthur M. Sackler Museum, Cambridge, 02/18/2006 - 07/23/2006

Verification Level

3 - Good. Object is well described and information is vetted